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Welcome to an almost daily peek at our beautiful Williamsburg, Virginia which includes the "Historic Triangle" consisting of Colonial Williamsburg -the world’s largest living history museum- Yorktown and Jamestown.

June 14, 2012

Royal Welch Fusiliers Redoubt, Yorktown, Virginia





 The Royal Welch Fusiliers Redoubt is a large, star shaped earthen fort high above the York River. The redoubt was made by digging a deep trench and creating a mound with spiked poles. It prevented attacks on the troops hidden behind the embankments and had only one small entryway. From this location cannon fire could be directed at passing boats.

The Royal Welch Fusiliers successfully repelled French efforts to take the position until the British surrendered.

8 comments:

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Linda said...

Great photos and post.

Robert Geiss said...

How interesting a sight and story behind. Thank you for this adventure. Please have you all a good Friday.

Michelle said...

History is always so interesting.

Oakland Daily Photo said...

We really enjoyed exploring the earthworks in York. Even in the rain. :D)

wildaboutwales said...

the RWF was founded in 1689. disbanded or rather amalgamated with RRW in 2006.Soldiers of this regiment were distinguishable by the unique feature of the "flash", consisting of five overlapping black silk ribbons (seven inches long for soldiers and nine inches long for officers) on the back of the uniform jacket at neck level.[1] This is a legacy of the days when it was normal for soldiers to wear pigtails. In 1808, this practice was discontinued, but the RWF were serving in Nova Scotia[2] when the order to discontinue the use of the flash was issued they were at sea and didn't receive the order. Upon their return at an inspection they were cited for having improper hair. They decided to retain the ribbons with which the pigtail was tied as a declaration against over regulation, and were granted this special concession by the King. The Army Council attempted to remove the flash during the First World War citing the grounds that it would help the Germans identify which unit was facing them. As Fusilier Robert Graves reported, "the regiment retorted by inquiring on what occasion since the retreat from Corunna, when the regiment was the last to leave Spain, with the keys of the town postern in the pocket of one of its officers, had any of His Majesty's enemies seen the back of a Royal Welch Fusilier?," and the matter remained "in abeyance throughout the war."[3]
As a fusilier regiment, the RWF wore a hackle, which consisted of a plume of white feathers mounted behind the cap-badge of the modern beret. The full dress of the Royal Welch Fusiliers, as worn by the entire regiment until 1914, included a racoon-skin hat (bearskin for officers) with a white hackle and a scarlet tunic with the dark blue facings of a Royal regiment. This uniform continued to be worn by the RWF's Corps of Drums and the Regimental Pioneers until the merger of 2006.

Karl Demetz said...

Interesting images and post. Have a nice weekend - K

Pat Tillett said...

Great and interesting post! So were the comments! Your great photos are made even better by the historical information...

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